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How to give presentations with a PlayBook


One of the coolest features of RIM's BlackBerry PlayBook tablet is how well the device works as a multimedia presentation tool. With its integrated HDMI output and suite of Documents To Go apps, you can deliver high-resolution presentations with ease.

RIM also added a few tweaks to give the PlayBook an advantage over the iPad, such as the capability of selectively locking presentation content to the HDMI output while freeing up the tablet screen for private use and shuffling elements behind the scenes.

For those who want to learn more, I've put together this video and slideshow to run you through some presentation tips and tricks for the BlackBerry PlayBook.


 

The white iPhone: Does size matter?

We couldn't see any difference between
the two iPhones in this photo.

Few companies other than Apple can inspire such burning questions in the tech world. And until they're answered, those questions orbit around the blogosphere at tremendous speed. When will Verizon get the iPhone? How much will the next MacBook weigh? Will the iPad ever get Flash?

In the last few weeks, however, one question has put the tech press on the the edge of its collective seat like never before. It wasn't about the capacity of the next iPod, but rather whether the long-elusive white iPhone 4 was thicker than its black counterpart. Apple fans demanded to know the truth in forums and ugly rumors spread that your existing case or bumper wouldn't quite fit. The reported difference was miniscule ("roughly 0.2mm" as TiPb put in) and other outlets said that there was no difference at all. Yet, the chatter was loud enough for Apple SVP of Product Marketing Phil Schiller to tweet, "It's not thicker. Don't believe all the junk that you read."

That could have put the issue to rest, but we just had to see for ourselves whether the rumors were true. When we took it from the box we couldn't see any design differences outside of the white skin and the more visible proximity sensor above the speaker (on the black phone the sensor blends in with the bezel). We also tried a couple of cases and they fit without any problem, but even then we weren't satisfied. So we took two iPhone 4s and traveled a few blocks from CNET's offices to put the question in the hands of experts. TechShop s a membership-based workshop that has just about every tool and machine you can imagine, from laser cutters to a drill press. Our needs were basic--just digital calipers, a micrometer, and one of TechShop's "Dream Coaches" to run the test.

After a few minutes of waiting with bated breath, we found that the white iPhone is indeed thicker, but only by the tiniest amount. According to the micrometer, for example, the comparison was between 9.4mm and 9.308mm. No, it won't make any difference in usability--and your case or bumper will still fit--but our white iPhone was a bit fatter around the waist. Watch the video below for the full details.

Now there are a few things to keep in mind. Tools can vary in accuracy and the differences could be due to imperfections in the skin or even dust or a bit of grease caught between the tool and the phone. What's more, it's very possible for a manufacturing assembly line to turn out two models of the same product with slightly different measurements. You may get different results measuring your white iPhone and you may find no difference at all.

But whatever the reason, we're already told you that the 0.092 gap will make no difference in your everyday use. And that's the most important fact to remember. So if you're freaking out (and really, why would you?) there's no reason to do so. Rather, we suspect that most iPhone users couldn't care less. And in all seriousness, there's no reason that you should.


Does the white iPhone 4 measure up?



White iPhone 4


 

How to transfer music from an iPod to your computer


Most of us store music in two places: on our computer and on our iPod (or other MP3 player). But if your computer crashes indefinitely, all the music you (hopefully) purchased disappears along with it. So what's left? A handicapped iPod, as Apple restricts its gadgets to sync with one music library--any attempts to sync with a different computer will result in a deleted iPod.

Naturally, there's a workaround. If you'd like to safely move songs from your iPod (except the iPod Touch) to any computer, follow these steps:


How to transfer music from an iPod to a Mac

Step 1 : Connect your iPod and launch iTunes. In the iPod management screen, scroll down to Options and check "Enable disk use." iTunes will give you a warning--select OK.

Step 2 : Now your iPod will show up as a drive on your Desktop. But before you can access its files, download and install a program called Houdini. Houdini lets you view the music folder that's automatically hidden by Apple.

Step 3 : Open Houdini, click "Folders," and then "Reveal." Locate your iPod, and open "iPod_controls." Highlight "Music," and press Choose.

Step 4 : Now in your iPod folder, open iPod_Controls > Music. Highlight all of the folders and drag them into the desired folder on your hard drive. This might take a while, depending on how much music you're transferring.

Once the files are copied, you've successfully transferred the music. However, you'll notice that the songs have four-letter names and are scattered among many folders. It's OK. Once you import the music into iTunes (or any other media player), the program will reinstate the titles of the songs.


How to transfer music to an iPod to a Windows computer.

Step 1 : Connect your iPod and launch iTunes. In the iPod management screen, scroll down to Options and check "Enable disk use." iTunes will give you a warning--select OK.

Note: If you get an error message asking you to reformat upon connecting, your iPod was originally formatted for Mac and cannot be used in Windows. One workaround is to install a program like MacDrive, which will allow your Windows machine to read Mac-formatted drives. Clicking "reformat" will erase your iPod.

Step 2 : Now open My Computer and open your iPod drive.

Step 3 : Open Tools > Folder Options. Click the View tab and check  "Show hidden files and folders."

Step 4 : Now in your iPod folder, open iPod_Controls > Music. Highlight all of the folders and drag them into the desired folder on your hard drive. This might take a while, depending on how much music you're transferring.

Step 5 : Highlight all of the folders again, right-click, and select Properties. Uncheck "Hidden." Close this window.

Once the files are copied, you've successfully transferred the music. However, you'll notice that the songs have four-letter names and are scattered among many folders. It's OK. Once you import the music into iTunes (or any other media player), the program will reinstate the titles of the songs.

 


   

Chrome 11 wants to hear you speak

Be careful venting your frustrations with modern technology when using the latest version of Google Chrome, released today. Chrome 11 (download for WindowsMacLinux) comes with the ability to convert your speech to text, which could prove to be a big boon to people who have difficulty with keyboards as well as providing on the go translations when used with Google Translate.

Chrome now can convert your speech to HTML. This can be tested most easily on the Google Translate site. Note that it works only for English at the moment.


The new feature, based in HTML5, requires a microphone icon embedded in the Web page. Click the icon and then speak into your computer's mike. The input records as text, and the browser automatically inserts the text into the available form field.

You can test this by going to Google Translate and clicking the microphone icon in the lower right corner of the text field. At the time of writing, the microphone and voice-to-HTML feature appears to work only with English.

While the feature is interesting to include in a browser, it's hardly a random decision on Google's part. By including a speech-to-text feature, the Chrome OS instantly provides a modicum of accessibility for users who have difficulty with keyboards. When the browser is the operating system, being able to speak to the computer and have the computer know how to interpret that speech is a quick way to ensure a broader appeal.

Other changes in Chrome 11 include the introduction of hardware accelerated 3D CSS, bug fixes in cloud print, a security update to the built-in version of Adobe Flash, and user agent string changes introduced to bring Chrome in line with user agent changes made in Firefox 4. The jump from Chrome 11 beta to stable also includes 25 security changes, including 15 marked as high risk. These fixes cover potential risks such as URL bar spoofing during navigation errors, and numerous instances of stale pointers in PDF forms, sandboxing, and drop-down list handling.

Google has been moving forward with its less stable versions of Chrome too. It recently bumped Google Chrome Canary version 13 (Windows download only), the first version of Chrome to reach that milestone. Chrome Canary 13 doesn't appear to have any features different from Chrome dev 12 at this time.

Google Chrome dev 12.0.742.9 (download for WindowsMacLinux) includes tweaks to the Sync interface, introduces a new version of the V8 JavaScript engine, and has been offering a still-in-development feature that lets users select multiple tabs at once. There's also an experimental "new tab" page, which users can activate through the about:flags configuration screen, and a multiple profile option for having different user profiles under the same Windows log-in. Currently, this is available only on the Windows version of Chrome dev, though like speech-to-HTML it has bigger implications for Chrome OS.


 

Protect your iPhone location data

 

   

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